Category Archives: Capital Markets

Capital Market Assumptions: Mid-Year Update

Every year, we update our forward-looking Capital Market Assumptions – the building blocks of our asset allocation work on behalf of Sellwood clients – as of December 31. Because equity and bond markets have changed so considerably in the first quarter of this year, we have taken the extraordinary step of updating those assumptions outside … Continue reading Capital Market Assumptions: Mid-Year Update


2020 Capital Market Assumptions

Download our 2020 Capital Market Assumptions White Paper. Sellwood Consulting’s 2020 Capital Market Assumptions contemplate a prospective lower-return environment caused by last year’s extraordinary valuation expansion in nearly every asset category. These 10-year, forward-looking assumptions of asset class return, risk, and correlation are the key input variables for our asset allocation work on behalf of clients. … Continue reading 2020 Capital Market Assumptions


2019 Capital Market Assumptions

Note: These assumptions are now outdated. Our current capital market assumptions and our white paper documenting their construction can always be found on our Capital Market Assumptions page. Sellwood Consulting’s 2019 Capital Market Assumptions are available. These 10-year, forward-looking assumptions of asset class return, risk, and correlation are the key input variables for our asset allocation work on behalf … Continue reading 2019 Capital Market Assumptions


2018 Capital Market Assumptions

Note: These assumptions are now outdated. Our current capital market assumptions and our white paper documenting their construction can always be found on our Capital Market Assumptions page. Sellwood Consulting’s 2018 Capital Market Assumptions are available. These 10-year, forward-looking assumptions of asset class return, risk, and correlation are the key input variables for our asset allocation work on behalf … Continue reading 2018 Capital Market Assumptions


Thoughts on the “Brexit”

UK voters shocked the world last night by voting, in a surprise, to leave the European Union. The nation will be the first to leave the 28-nation bloc, The vote was followed by British Prime Minister David Cameron’s announcement that he will resign, and by global equity markets declining meaningfully. In the UK itself, substantial losses early in the day have partially reversed course,